EVENTS IN THIS SERIES

COVID-19 & THE ECONOMY: THE GOOD, THE BAD & THE UGLY 

Eller College of Management

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EXPLORING OUR CONNECTIONS: THE HUMAN-ANIMAL BOND DURING COVID-19

College of Veterinary Medicine

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 THE CHANGING LANDSCAPE OF EDUCATION: THE DIGITAL DIVIDE

College of Education

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RESILIENCY AT HOME: HURRICANE KATRINA TO COVID-19

Norton School of Family & Consumer Sciences

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TECHNOLOGY & YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS IN THE COVID-19 RESPONSE

University of Arizona College of Law

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STAYING INFORMED: COVID-19 ANTIBODY TESTING & IMMUNE SYSTEM SUPPORT

College of Medicine – Tucson

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UNITED STATES PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION 2020 

School of Government & Public Policy

Thursday, September 24 | 12 PM

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 RELIGION, RACE & HEALTH: SOLUTIONS TO DISPARITY IN CARE

College of Humanities

Thursday, October 15 | 4 PM

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MORE FALL PROGRAMMING IS ON THE WAY

 

Stay Tuned

 

COVID-19 & THE ECONOMY: THE GOOD, THE BAD & THE UGLY

In this panel discussion, you'll hear from esteemed faculty members from Eller College about the virus's effect on Arizona's economy, the hardest hit industries, and the outlook for the state's recovery. We will also explore the government's response to the virus, specifically a slow economy and high unemployment, and how it compares to earlier crises. 

 

Presenters: 

  • George Hammond, Economic and Business Research Center Director
  • Price Fishback, Thomas R. Brown Professor of Economics
  • Alice Bonaime, Associate Professor and Philip Rhoads Fellow in Finance

 

EXPLORING OUR CONNECTIONS: THE HUMAN-ANIMAL BOND DURING COVID-19

In this panel discussion you'll hear from esteemed faculty members currently collaborating on the first interdisciplinary human-animal bond research study at the University of Arizona College of Veterinary Medicine. The discussion will explore research examining how the human-animal bond impacts social connections, consumer behaviors, and feelings of loneliness induced by COVID-19.

To find out more about the College of Veterinary Medicine and how you can support their efforts, contact Marianne Hadden at mariannehadden@arizona.edu or visit vetmed.arizona.edu.

 

Presenters: 

  • Julie Funk (Moderator), Dean, College of Veterinary Medicine
  • Jamie Boehmer, Associate Dean, College of Veterinary Medicine
  • Evan MacleanAssistant Professor, Anthropology
  • Martin Reimann, Associate Professor of Marketing, Eller College of Management

 

THE CHANGING LANDSCAPE OF EDUCATION: THE DIGITAL DIVIDE

In this panel discussion,  faculty members from the College of Education and the superintendent of the Sunnyside Unified School District discuss the future of education after COVID-19 and the digital divide, which is heavily interwoven with issues of race, education, and poverty. Panelists will address the challenges surrounding the transition to remote learning and the need for additional funding and teacher training. They will also explore issues surrounding educational equity and access to technology for students, teachers, parents, and other professionals in special education, K-12, and higher education.

Presenters: 

  • Marla Franco (Moderator), Assistant Vice Provost for HSI Initiatives & Faculty Affiliate, Center for the Study of Higher Education
  • IngriQue Salt, Diné Lók’aad Dine’é | Ashį̨́į̨̨̨́hį́ | Bit’ąąnįį | To’díchįįnį̨į, Program Coordinator, Indigenous Teacher Education Project
  • Sunggye Hong, Associate Professor, Disability & Psychoeducational Studies
  • Steven Holmes, Superintendent of the Sunnyside Unified School District and UA Alumnus

 

 

RESILIENCY AT HOME: HURRICANE KATRINA TO COVID-19

Families are the cornerstones of our communities and our society. The Frances McClelland Institute for Children, Youth, and Families builds innovative teams of scientists committed to working with community members to tackle the most pressing issues facing families today. From natural disasters, like Hurricane Katrina, to the current COVID-19 pandemic, families across the globe are facing unprecedented challenges including increasing economic hardship, lack of access to educational resources for children, and the potential for family conflict.

 

Presenters: 

  • Laura Scaramella (Moderator), Director, Norton School of Family & Consumer Sciences; Professor & Fitch Nesbitt Endowed Chair, Family Studies & Human Development
  • Melissa BarnettNorton Endowed Chair in Fathers, Parenting & Families; Fitch Nesbitt Associate Professor in Family Studies & Human Development; Director of the Frances McClelland Institute for Children, Youth & Families
  • Melissa Curran, Associate Professor, Family Studies & Human Development; Director of Research, Take Charge America Institute
  • Melissa Delgado, Associate Professor, Family Studies & Human Development

Additional Resources:

 

TECHNOLOGY & YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS IN THE COVID-19 RESPONSE

The COVID-19 pandemic has raised the stakes of current technology law and policy debates. Are we willing to tolerate more surveillance in exchange for better health outcomes? Who should get to make the speech rules for large private platforms? How, if at all, should offline rules apply to our digital worlds? Our panelists for this discussion, who are both Professors of Law at the University of Arizona College of Law, will discuss these topics and answer participant questions.

Presenters: 

  • Daisy Jenkins (Moderator), President of Daisy Jenkins & Associates, LLC
  • Jane Bambauer, Professor of Law at the James E. Rogers College of Law
  • Andrew Woods, Professor of Law at the James E. Rogers College of Law

 

 

STAYING INFORMED: COVID-19 ANTIBODY TESTING & IMMUNE SYSTEM SUPPORT

The University of Arizona’s College of Medicine – Tucson has been actively involved in the fight against COVID-19 and has selected panelists to address and inform the public on related topics. Janko Nikolich-Žugich, the principal investigator on antibody testing for the state of Arizona, will provide an overview of COVID-19 testing and plans for test and/or vaccine development. Michael D. L. Johnson, a fellow immunologist, will join Janko in a detailed overview of the virus and how it attacks the immune system. 

Presenters: 

  • Karen Lutrick (Moderator), Assistant Professor, Family & Community Medicine
  • Janko Nikolich-Žugich, Bowman Professor & Head, Department of Immunobiology - Co-Director, Arizona Center on Aging
  • Michael D. L. Johnson, Assistant Professor, Immunobiology; Assistant Professor, BIO5 Institute
  • AZ HEROES Study: The goal of the Arizona Healthcare, Emergency Response, and Other Essential Workers Surveillance (AZ HEROES) Study is to enhance our knowledge of the epidemiologic and immunologic characteristics of novel COVID-19 infection and reinfection among high-exposure individuals who provide critical services to our communities. Visit azheroes.arizona.edu or email azheroes@arizona.edu for more information
  • Antibody Testing Initiative: As part of a statewide research study, the University of Arizona is analyzing the blood samples of hundreds of thousands of Arizonans to determine who has developed antibodies against the virus that causes COVID-19. The State of Arizona is providing $3.5 million for the testing, which is available at more than two dozen locations across the state. Learn more at covid19antibodytesting.arizona.edu
  • CoVHORT: Whether you have had COVID-19 or not, we need your help! Information from COVID-19 survivors and otherwise healthy participants is crucial to answering questions surrounding COVID-19. By participating in the CoVHORT study, you can help researchers gather the data we need to help better understand COVID-19. Become part of the solution! Fight the virus, join the CoVHORT study: covhort.arizona.edu
  • AZCOVIDTXT: The best way to fight COVID-19 is with information. Who is sick, where is the virus spreading? AZCOVIDTXT is a two-way texting system designed to allow us all to report on the health status of our households. This information helps us see how the virus is spreading and we can make the best decisions to stop it. We don’t have as much testing as we would like right now, and this information will be a big help to decision-makers and health providers to deliver the right resources to the right people at the right time. Visit azcovidtxt.org for more information
  • Click here to read a highlight on Michael D. L. Johnson's work on copper and its effects in the New York Times. 

Q: Do you know much about the Russian vaccine? If so, does it look hopeful?

A: It is based on adenovirus backbone, which is likely to be safe, although I am worried that they are skipping the most important phase of trials, and are going into people after insufficient safety testing. Adenovirus-based vaccines need to overcome existing immunity against other adenoviruses that many humans have encountered, so I am also curious to see the results on efficacy. I also wonder why were they so eager to hack into all other vaccine programs if they have a good vaccine.

Q: Do you have any clarification on the controversy of hydroxychloroquine - in what context does it/does not help?

A: There is no evidence from a randomized, controlled intervention trial that HCL works in any setting, and that is the type of study that is necessary to establish efficacy without confounding the effects of this drug with other treatments that people got or did not get. There is plenty of evidence from such trials that it does not work or that it could be harmful. There really should be no controversy and most of the medical community agrees on that.

Q: Could you discuss the pluses and minuses of antibody versus antigen testing. Specifically, one criticism of antibody testing is that it takes several days for the body to produce antibodies after COVID-19 exposure, while antigen is fast. However, how fast? If I am exposed to COVID-19 today, when will antigen testing pick up the infection?

A: The two tests detect different things. Antigen test detects current infection, much like the swab PCR test. Antibody test detects the evidence that one had mounted an immune response and therefore HAD an infection; it is not a good indicator of current infection. The body needs at least 5-7 days to produce detectable antibodies, and even then we see it in only ~30% of people; by 14 days, we see it in pretty much everyone who was infected, so it is a test that detects immunity later after infection. If properly done, it provides evidence of both exposure and of immunity to the virus, and we have discussed at length the ins and outs of durability.

US PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION 2020

With the presidential election quickly approaching, politics are at the top of everyone’s mind. Tune into this timely discussion in which faculty from the School of Government of Political Policy apply their expertise to topics ranging from political behavior, authoritarianism, and increasing polarization. Our experts will also provide predictions about the Arizona election based on their current research and tell us how their research sheds light on voting patterns

 

Presenters: 

  • Johnathan Rothschild (Moderator), Former Mayor of Tucson and Professor of Practice at The James E. Rogers College of Law
  • Samara Klar, Associate Professor, School of Government and Public Policy
  • Chris WeberAssociate Professor, Director of PhD Program - School of Government and Public Policy 
  • Lisa Sanchez, Assistant Professor, School of Government and Public Policy

Additional Resources:

 

RELIGION, RACE & HEALTH: SOLUTIONS TO DISPARITY IN CARE

Systemic inequalities have created a far more dire impact for COVID-19 among minority populations, but long before the pandemic, communities of color have struggled with healthcare crises based on a lack of access to adequate facilities and practitioners. Religious organizations have functioned as bridges between mainstream healthcare and under-served communities, but the underlying issues remain. Join us for this panel discussion where you will hear from esteemed panelists from the University of Arizona’s College of Humanities and Health Sciences as they discuss how these intersecting issues of diversity are essential to justice in healthcare.

Presenters: 

  • Dr. David Beyda (Moderator), Chair and Professor, University of Arizona College of Medicine- Phoenix, Department of Bioethics and Medical Humanism; Director, Ethics Theme; Director, Global Health Program; President and Founder of Covenant Medicine Outreach
  • Jerome Dotson, Assistant Professor, Africana Studies
  • Kristy Slominski, Assistant Professor, Religious Studies & Classics
  • Johnathan Vaknin, Assistant Professor, Spanish & Portuguese
  • Dr. Francisco Garcia, MD, MPH, Deputy County Administrator and Chief Medical Officer for Health and Community Services